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 SPORTS NUTRITION – CASE STUDY

Introduction:

            According to the description of the lady she is at high risk of developing heart disease and diabetes. The main health risk behaviors are weight gain and smoking and at the middle age she is in, with the genetic inclinations she is prone to develop obesity, heart disease and diabetes. She needs to be really cautious about her health as she is at risk of many problems. She needs to improve her eating habits and indulge in more physical activity. Diabetes is a more chronic disease while heart disease can be fatal as well. Thus, the lady is at huge health risk if she continues to gain weight or switch back to smoking. She is under very high risk zone because she has genetic inclinations as well for these diseases.

Main Body:

            Obesity, smoking and genetic factors add up to a much high risk of heart disease and diabetes. The lady had been smoking and it is good that she left smoking but the weight gain is not a good sign. She is also at risk of high blood pressure which might result into heart attack and similar fatal conditions. Another health risk with which is associated is brain damage due to obesity and smoking. She has a history for smoking and when she left smoking, gained 20 pounds which increases the risk of affecting the brain as she is in middle age. She should consult her physician for a strict diet based on her conditions as she is required to lose a lot of weight to stay fit and stay away from these diseases.

Genetic factors are the most strong reasons for occurrence of the diseases as they are predisposed and difficult to be dealt with even physical exercise and going on a diet. Other factors like obesity and smoking have more direct influence on the disease risks. This means that controlling smoking and obesity has more pronounced effects on minimizing the consequences of the diseases than genetic factors because diseases in heredity tend to have an inclination which can be combated by healthy living and staying fit. The lady can get these diseases even after controlling her diet and increasing physical activity but that is predisposed as well as unlikely. Thus, she is advised to take healthy nutritious food along with some supplements as advised by her physician and start to do some regular exercises for controlling her weight. This can bring a drastic positive change.

The diseases like obesity, high blood pressure and diabetes are interconnected with high weight gain and smoking. The consequences are worse when the patient is of middle age as is the case discussed in this paper. The eating habits should be altered to control the growing weight as she has recently added 20 pounds after leaving smoking. She should be taking nutritive rich diet instead of fattening food as it has direct consequences on her health. Physical activity is also very necessary but at her age consultation of the physician is a must. As the requirements and stamina of the body changes with age thus the same advice will not work for her as it was when she was 20. Her diet should be high on fruits and vegetables and totally avoid fattening food.

Conclusion:

The case study discussed has the patient who is prone to heart disease, obesity and diabetes. She needs to be really cautious about her health as she is at risk of many problems. She needs to improve her eating habits and indulge in more physical activity. Diabetes is a more chronic disease while heart disease can be fatal as well. Thus, the lady is at huge health risk if she continues to gain weight or switch back to smoking. The diseases like obesity, high blood pressure and diabetes are interconnected with high weight gain and smoking. The consequences are worse when the patient is of middle age as is the case discussed in this paper.

References:

Schauer, G L., & Halperin A C., (2013). Health professional advice for smoking and weight in adults with diabetes, 36 (1): 8 – 10.

Mancl L A., & Doescher MP., (2011). High blood pressure, diabetes, smoking and obesity in middle age may shrink brain and damage thinking, 1 (1): 1 – 4.